Micah Redding — Christian Transhumanism: faith, technology & the future

Murphy's Loft Showcase

Shelley Raymond's free and fearless vocals range from a cooing whisper to a soulful, plaintiff howl. Her lyrics tear you apart line by line, only to build you back again with verse after verse of surgically precise digs and strokes. Raymond casually combines elements of soul and folk into something she playfully refers to as "soulk music" (which, afterall, sounds better than "foul music"). Whatever she calls it, it's not your average girl-with-a-guitar fare and deserves your undivided ear.
http://www.myspace.com/shelleyraymond


Rob Hawkins is a singer/songwriter that grew up as a well-travelled Air-Force brat before the age of five from Arizona to New Hampshire. Moving eventually from Ohio to Nashville he continues to ride the crossroads of music with his emotional voice, strong musicianship, and message driven songs.


Shawn A Finson (Wee the People)
Wee the People are a band; although, the name Wee the People refers less to a group of band mates and more to a group consciousness. It is a tribute to “the little people” or the commoners—those whose voice is rarely heard above the incessant drone of an ever present, growing, and looming noise machine. Wee the People use song to try and break through that ugliness. Sometimes we strive for harmony and other times we resort to dissonance, paying less homage to ideas about style than to the seminal ideas, which ultimately get stylized. Wee the People feel song is a great place to be idealistic, if not romantic. We are simply happy to have a voice, albeit small. We don’t claim to speak for everyone or even to make songs that appeal to the majority. We do, however, hope that our songs speak to someone. And we hope that someone joins in the conversation.
http://www.weethepeople.us/

Seth Harper is basically new to the Nashville music scene. Sprouting from deep Alabama roots, Seth looks to further a sort of Renaissance for his homeland, keeping his music wide-ranging but at the same time distinctly Southern in delivery. His voice is gritty, yet pleasant, and his songs are honest, yet oddly poetic. He tends to weave tales of weary souls, beautiful women, and second chances, all the while putting on an explicitly spiritual edge. He is still looking for just the right bandmates, but until then he will walk this road all by himself.
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(Frank Salerno)

Gentry Morris